Nagra study identifies Television Tribes

Content protection provider Nagra released “Television Tribes,” a study that reveals the new reality of pay TV consumer viewing types and outlines how operators can unlock new revenue opportunities by catering to their complex needs with relevant content, experiences and technology.

The study – carried out in partnership with Ampere Analysis – surveyed consumers across ten advanced countries globally and identifies five unique “Television Tribes”: “Content Connoisseurs”, a young, affluent and tech-savvy early adopter group who want everything on demand and are willing to pay for it. They are also the most likely to churn; “Broadcast Bingers”, a low-spending group best entertained when binge watching box sets; “Digitally Detached”, an older generation, harder to reach and least likely to spend money on pay TV content; ” TV Traditionalists”, a middle-aged group of linear TV consumers most interested in the big screen, and particularly in sports, and “Super Spenders”, linear TV experts with money to spend to have full bundle access to content.

The research focuses on Content Connoisseurs, the most valuable and fastest-growing consumer type, but also the most demanding, making up 24% of the global market. Nearly 80 % of Content Connoisseurs cite online video platforms as their main source of TV and film content. They also predict their household will stop watching linear TV completely within five years, but their love of content makes them the most likely Tribe to subscribe to pay TV services.

TV Traditionalists are the second most valuable Tribe for pay TV operators. Representing 18% of market share, they are often overlooked in the multi-device and OTT era. This group is willing to pay for core TV services, including access to live sports and movies. They are also less likely to churn than any other Tribe, with only 9% saying they switched within the last six months.

Click here to download the “Television Tribes” report.

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